skip to main content
Resource type Show Results with: Show Results with: Index

Wrist range of motion and motion frequency during toy and game play with a joint-specific controller specially designed to provide neuromuscular therapy: A proof of concept study in typically developing children

Crisco, Joseph J ; Schwartz, Joel B ; Wilcox, Bethany ; Brideau, Holly ; Basseches, Benjamin ; Kerman, Karen

Journal of Biomechanics, 20 August 2015, Vol.48(11), pp.2844-2848 [Peer Reviewed Journal]

Full text available online

Citations Cited by
  • Title:
    Wrist range of motion and motion frequency during toy and game play with a joint-specific controller specially designed to provide neuromuscular therapy: A proof of concept study in typically developing children
  • Author/Creator: Crisco, Joseph J ; Schwartz, Joel B ; Wilcox, Bethany ; Brideau, Holly ; Basseches, Benjamin ; Kerman, Karen
  • Language: English
  • Subjects: Pediatrics ; Cerebral Palsy ; Therapy ; Toys ; Games ; Medicine ; Engineering ; Anatomy & Physiology
  • Is Part Of: Journal of Biomechanics, 20 August 2015, Vol.48(11), pp.2844-2848
  • Description: Upper extremities affected by hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP) and other neuromuscular disorders have been demonstrated to benefit from therapy, and the greater the duration of the therapy, the greater the benefit. A great motivator for participating in and extending the duration of therapy with children is play. Our focus is on active motion therapy of the wrist and forearm. In this study we examine the wrist motions associated with playing with two toys and three computer games controlled by a specially-designed play controller. Twenty children (ages 5-11) with no diagnosis of a muscular disorder were recruited. The play controller was fitted to the wrist and forearm of each child and used to measure and log wrist flexion and extension. Play activity and enjoyment were quantified by average wrist range of motion (ROM), motion frequency measures, and a discrete visual scale. We found significant differences in the average wrist ROM and motion frequency among the toys and games, yet there were no differences in the level of enjoyment across all toys and games, which was high. These findings indicate which toys and games may elicit the greater number of goal-directed movements, and lay the foundation for our long-term goal to develop and evaluate innovative motion-specific play controllers that are engaging rehabilitative devices for enhancing therapy and promoting neural plasticity and functional recovery in children with CP.
  • Identifier: ISSN: 0021-9290 ; E-ISSN: 1873-2380 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.jbiomech.2015.04.018