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Transmission of Entamoeba nuttalli and Trichuris trichiura from Nonhuman Primates to Humans

Levecke, Bruno ; Dorny, Pierre ; Vercammen, Francis ; Visser, Leo G ; Van Esbroeck, Marjan ; Vercruysse, Jozef ; Verweij, Jaco J

Emerging Infectious Diseases, 2015, Vol.21(10), p.1871-1872 [Peer Reviewed Journal]

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  • Title:
    Transmission of Entamoeba nuttalli and Trichuris trichiura from Nonhuman Primates to Humans
  • Author/Creator: Levecke, Bruno ; Dorny, Pierre ; Vercammen, Francis ; Visser, Leo G ; Van Esbroeck, Marjan ; Vercruysse, Jozef ; Verweij, Jaco J
  • Subjects: Letter ; Letter ; Transmission Of And From Nonhuman Primates To Humans ; Parasites ; Zoonoses ; Entamoeba Nuttalli ; Trichuris Trichiura ; Nonhuman Primates ; Zoos ; Humans ; Invasive Amebiasis ; Transmission ; Prevalence
  • Is Part Of: Emerging Infectious Diseases, 2015, Vol.21(10), p.1871-1872
  • Description: To the Editor: Entamoeba nuttalli parasites are frequently found in fecal samples of nonhuman primates (NHPs) in zoos (1). This gastrointestinal pathogen is the causative agent of invasive amebiasis in NHPs, which may result in hemorrhagic dysentery, liver abscess or other extraintestinal pathologies, and even death (2). E. histolytica infection is the cause of invasive amebiasis in humans and can also cause experimentally invasive amebiasis in NHPs (3). The host specificity of E. nuttalli and E. histolytica parasites remains largely unknown. Although molecular analyses indicate that E. nuttalli parasites are genetically different from E. histolytica parasites (4), and hence provide a unique marker to identify zoonotic transmission, molecular tools have not been applied extensively to determine the presence of E. nuttalli in humans (5). Moreover, studies suggesting transmission have been based on clinical outbreaks in animal caretakers (2), and because infections may not always be symptomatic, the results of those studies may underestimate the incidence.
  • Identifier: ISSN: 1080-6040 ; E-ISSN: 1080-6059 ; DOI: 10.3201/eid2110.141456 ; PMCID: 4593423