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Sleep-Cognition Hypothesis In maritime Pilots, what is the effect of long-term work-related poor sleep on cognition and amyloid accumulation in healthy middle-aged maritime pilots: methodology of a case–control study

Thomas, Jana ; Ooms, Sharon ; Verbeek, Marcel ; Booij, Jan ; Rijpkema, Mark ; Kessels, Roy P C ; Overeem, Sebastiaan ; Claassen, Jurgen

BMJ Open, 26 June 2019, Vol.9(6) [Peer Reviewed Journal]

British Medical Journal Publishing Group

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  • Title:
    Sleep-Cognition Hypothesis In maritime Pilots, what is the effect of long-term work-related poor sleep on cognition and amyloid accumulation in healthy middle-aged maritime pilots: methodology of a case–control study
  • Author/Creator: Thomas, Jana ; Ooms, Sharon ; Verbeek, Marcel ; Booij, Jan ; Rijpkema, Mark ; Kessels, Roy P C ; Overeem, Sebastiaan ; Claassen, Jurgen
  • Publisher: British Medical Journal Publishing Group
  • Language: English
  • Subjects: Alzheimer’s Disease ; Amyloid Accumulation ; Neurodegeneration ; Cognitive Function ; Sleep
  • Is Part Of: BMJ Open, 26 June 2019, Vol.9(6)
  • Description: Evidence indicates a bidirectional relationship between poor sleep and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). While AD may lead to disruption of normal sleep, poor sleep in itself may play a causal role in the development of AD by influencing the production and/or clearance of the amyloid-beta (Aβ) protein. This led to the hypothesis that extended periods (>10 years) of sleep loss could lead to Aβ accumulation with subsequent cognitive AD-related decline. This manuscript describes the methodology of the SCHIP study, a cohort study in maritime pilots that aims at investigating the relationship between prolonged work-related sleep loss, cognitive function and amyloid accumulation among healthy middle-aged maritime pilots, to test the hypothesis that prolonged sleep loss increases the risk of AD-related cognitive decline.
  • Identifier: ISSN: 2044-6055 ; E-ISSN: 2044-6055 ; DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-026992