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Estimated Effects of Future Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations on Protein Intake and the Risk of Protein Deficiency by Country and Region

Medek, Danielle E. ; Schwartz, Joel ; Myers, Samuel S.

Medek, Danielle E., Joel Schwartz, and Samuel S. Myers. 2017. “Estimated Effects of Future Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations on Protein Intake and the Risk of Protein Deficiency by Country and Region.” Environmental Health Perspectives 125 (8): 087002. doi:10.1289/EHP41. http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP41. [Peer Reviewed Journal]

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  • Title:
    Estimated Effects of Future Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations on Protein Intake and the Risk of Protein Deficiency by Country and Region
  • Author/Creator: Medek, Danielle E. ; Schwartz, Joel ; Myers, Samuel S.
  • Language: English
  • Subjects: Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide – Forecasts and Trends ; Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide – Environmental Aspects ; Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide – Health Aspects ; Human Nutrition – Research ; Protein Deficiency – Risk Factors ; Food Shortages – Health Aspects ; Food Shortages – United States ; Food Shortages – Europe
  • Is Part Of: Medek, Danielle E., Joel Schwartz, and Samuel S. Myers. 2017. “Estimated Effects of Future Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations on Protein Intake and the Risk of Protein Deficiency by Country and Region.” Environmental Health Perspectives 125 (8): 087002. doi:10.1289/EHP41. http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP41.
  • Description: Background: Crops grown under elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (eCO2) contain less protein. Crops particularly affected include rice and wheat, which are primary sources of dietary protein for many countries. Objectives: We aimed to estimate global and country-specific risks of protein deficiency attributable to anthropogenic CO2 emissions by 2050. Methods: To model per capita protein intake in countries around the world under eCO2, we first established the effect size of eCO2 on the protein concentration of edible portions of crops by performing a meta-analysis of published literature. We then estimated per-country protein intake under current and anticipated future eCO2 using global food balance sheets (FBS). We modeled protein intake distributions within countries using Gini coefficients, and we estimated those at risk of deficiency from estimated average protein requirements (EAR) weighted by population age structure. Results: Under eCO2, rice, wheat, barley, and potato protein contents decreased by 7.6%, 7.8%, 14.1%, and 6.4%, respectively. Consequently, 18 countries may lose >5% of their dietary protein, including India (5.3%). By 2050, assuming today’s diets and levels of income inequality, an additional 1.6% or 148.4 million of the world’s population may be placed at risk of protein deficiency because of eCO2. In India, an additional 53 million people may become at risk. Conclusions: Anthropogenic CO2 emissions threaten the adequacy of protein intake worldwide. Elevated atmospheric CO2 may widen the disparity in protein intake within countries, with plant-based diets being the most vulnerable. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP41
  • Identifier: DOI: 10.1289/EHP41