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When Pinocchio’s nose does not grow: Belief regarding lie detectability modulates production of deception

Kamila Ewa Sip ; Kamila Ewa Sip ; Kamila Ewa Sip ; David Ecarmel ; Jennifer L Marchant ; Jennifer L Marchant ; Jian Eli ; Predrag Epetrovic ; Andreas Eroepstorff ; William B Mcgregor ; Christopher D Frith ; Christopher D Frith

Frontiers in human neuroscience, 01 February 2013, Vol.7 [Peer Reviewed Journal]

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  • Title:
    When Pinocchio’s nose does not grow: Belief regarding lie detectability modulates production of deception
  • Author/Creator: Kamila Ewa Sip ; Kamila Ewa Sip ; Kamila Ewa Sip ; David Ecarmel ; Jennifer L Marchant ; Jennifer L Marchant ; Jian Eli ; Predrag Epetrovic ; Andreas Eroepstorff ; William B Mcgregor ; Christopher D Frith ; Christopher D Frith
  • Language: English
  • Subjects: Deception ; Fmri ; Beliefs ; Mock Crime ; Lie-Detection ; Anatomy & Physiology
  • Is Part Of: Frontiers in human neuroscience, 01 February 2013, Vol.7
  • Description: Does the brain activity underlying the production of deception differ depending on whether or not one believes their deception can be detected? To address this question, we had participants commit a mock theft in a laboratory setting, and then interrogated them while they underwent functional MRI (fMRI) scanning. Crucially, during some parts of the interrogation participants believed a lie detector was activated, whereas in other parts they were told it was switched off. We were thus able to examine the neural activity associated with the contrast between producing true versus false claims, as well as the independent contrast between believing that deception could and could not be detected. We found increased activation in the right amygdala and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), as well as the left posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), during the production of false (compared to true) claims. Importantly, there was a significant interaction between the effects of deception and belief...
  • Identifier: E-ISSN: 1662-5161 ; DOI: 10.3389/fnhum.2013.00016