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Urinary concentrations of environmental phenols in pregnant women in a pilot study of the National Children's Study

Mortensen, Mary E ; Calafat, Antonia M ; Ye, Xiaoyun ; Wong, Lee-Yang ; Wright, David J ; Pirkle, James L ; Merrill, Lori S ; Moye, John

Environmental Research, February 2014, Vol.129, pp.32-38 [Peer Reviewed Journal]

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  • Title:
    Urinary concentrations of environmental phenols in pregnant women in a pilot study of the National Children's Study
  • Author/Creator: Mortensen, Mary E ; Calafat, Antonia M ; Ye, Xiaoyun ; Wong, Lee-Yang ; Wright, David J ; Pirkle, James L ; Merrill, Lori S ; Moye, John
  • Language: English
  • Subjects: Environmental Phenols ; Biomonitoring ; National Children'S Study ; National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey ; Pregnancy ; Environmental Sciences ; Public Health
  • Is Part Of: Environmental Research, February 2014, Vol.129, pp.32-38
  • Description: Environmental phenols are a group of chemicals with widespread uses in consumer and personal care products, food and beverage processing, and in pesticides. We assessed exposure to benzophenone-3, bisphenol A (BPA), triclosan, methyl- and propyl parabens, and 2,4- and 2,5-dichlorophenol or their precursors in 506 pregnant women enrolled in the National Children's Study (NCS) Vanguard Study. We measured the urinary concentrations of the target phenols by using online solid-phase extraction–isotope dilution high performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. NCS women results were compared to those of 524 similar-aged women in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2009–2010, and to 174 pregnant women in NHANES 2005–2010. In the NCS women, we found significant racial/ethnic differences ( <0.05) in regression adjusted mean concentrations of benzophenone-3, triclosan, 2,4- and 2,5-dichlorophenol, but not of BPA. Urinary 2,4- and 2,5-dichlorophenol concentrations were highly correlated ( =0.66, <0.0001). Except for BPA and triclosan, adjusted mean concentrations were significantly different across the 7 study sites. Education was marginally significant for benzophenone-3, triclosan, propyl paraben, and 2,5-dichlorophenol. Urinary concentrations of target phenols in NCS pregnant women and U.S. women and pregnant women were similar. In NCS pregnant women, race/ethnicity and geographic location determined urinary concentrations of most phenols (except BPA), suggesting differential exposures. NCS Main Study protocols should collect urine biospecimens and information about exposures to environmental phenols.
  • Identifier: ISSN: 0013-9351 ; E-ISSN: 1096-0953 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.envres.2013.12.004