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Cooking Schools Improve Nutrient Intake Patterns of People with Type 2 Diabetes

Archuleta, Martha ; Vanleeuwen, Dawn ; Halderson, Karen ; Jackson, K'Dawn ; Bock, Margaret Ann ; Eastman, Wanda ; Powell, Jennifer ; Titone, Michelle ; Marr, Carol ; Wells, Linda

Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, July 2012, Vol.44(4), pp.319-325 [Peer Reviewed Journal]

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  • Title:
    Cooking Schools Improve Nutrient Intake Patterns of People with Type 2 Diabetes
  • Author/Creator: Archuleta, Martha ; Vanleeuwen, Dawn ; Halderson, Karen ; Jackson, K'Dawn ; Bock, Margaret Ann ; Eastman, Wanda ; Powell, Jennifer ; Titone, Michelle ; Marr, Carol ; Wells, Linda
  • Language: English
  • Subjects: Type 2 Diabetes ; Nutrition Education ; Cooking Skills ; Food Choices ; Education ; Anatomy & Physiology ; Diet & Clinical Nutrition
  • Is Part Of: Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, July 2012, Vol.44(4), pp.319-325
  • Description: Objective: To determine whether cooking classes offered by the Cooperative Extension Service improved nutrient intake patterns in people with type 2 diabetes. Design: Quasi-experimental using pretest, posttest comparisons. Setting: Community locations including schools, churches, and senior centers. Participants: One hundred seventeen people with type 2 diabetes, from diverse ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds. Intervention: Series of classes for people with type 2 diabetes and their family members that incorporated Social Cognitive Theory tenets. The classes featured current nutrition recommendations for people with type 2 diabetes and hands-on cooking, where participants prepared and ate a meal together. Main Outcome Measures: Three-day food records, completed prior to attending cooking schools and 1 month after, were used to measure changes in energy intake and selected nutrients. Analysis: Program efficacy was assessed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test to compare differences between pre-training and post-training variables. ANCOVA was used to determine whether program efficacy was affected by sociodemographics. Results: Participants decreased (P less than 0.05) intakes of energy, fat grams, percentage of calories from fat, saturated fat grams, cholesterol (mg), sodium (mg), and carbohydrate grams. Conclusions and Implications: Nutrition education incorporating hands-on cooking can improve nutrient intake in people with type 2 diabetes from diverse ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds. (Contains 2 tables.)
  • Identifier: ISSN: 1499-4046 ; E-ISSN: 1878-2620 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.jneb.2011.10.006