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Lifetime air pollution exposure and asthma in a pediatric birth cohort

Rice, Mary B ; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L ; Litonjua, Augusto A ; Gillman, Matthew W ; Liebman, Nicole ; Kloog, Itai ; Luttmann-Gibson, Heike ; Coull, Brent A ; Schwartz, Joel ; Koutrakis, Petros ; Oken, Emily ; Mittleman, Murray A ; Gold, Diane R

The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, May 2018, Vol.141(5), pp.1932-1934.e7 [Peer Reviewed Journal]

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  • Title:
    Lifetime air pollution exposure and asthma in a pediatric birth cohort
  • Author/Creator: Rice, Mary B ; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L ; Litonjua, Augusto A ; Gillman, Matthew W ; Liebman, Nicole ; Kloog, Itai ; Luttmann-Gibson, Heike ; Coull, Brent A ; Schwartz, Joel ; Koutrakis, Petros ; Oken, Emily ; Mittleman, Murray A ; Gold, Diane R
  • Language: English
  • Subjects: Medicine
  • Is Part Of: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, May 2018, Vol.141(5), pp.1932-1934.e7
  • Description: The satellite model estimates were generated at 10 × 10–km resolution beginning in the year 2000.E10 PM2.5 estimation was then improved by using data from spatial predictors (eg, elevation, population density, traffic density, point and area emissions, and percentages of land use) and temporal predictors (eg, temperature, wind speed, and visibility), as described in detail in previous work.E10,E11 Using PM2.5 values measured on the ground throughout the Northeastern United States, we derived an estimate of local primary PM2.5 generated within 100 m of the home by traffic and the burning of heating fuel (in the winter) estimated by using a secondary land-use regression model.E10 All analyses of PM2.5 exposure were adjusted for local primary PM2.5 values and indicate the community-level exposure to primary and secondary PM2.5, including transported air pollution from outside of the community and primary particles generated more than 100 m from the home. An updated model with satellite data at a resolution of 1 × 1 km became available in 2003E12 after the last year of prenatal enrollment (1999-2002) for this cohort. [...]this model could not be used to estimate year 1 or lifetime exposure averages in this cohort. At each in-person visit, child height and weight were measured by a trained research assistant.Statistical analysis We analyzed associations between exposures and asthma outcomes using logistic regression models, adjusting for child's sex, age, race/ethnicity, parental history of asthma, breast-feeding duration, birth weight for gestational age z score, bronchiolitis in infancy, current household income and smoking, census tract income and education (using 2000 US Census data), season of birth, and date of visit. Early childhood (3-5 y), n = 1444 Midchildhood (7-10 y), n = 1242 Asthma/reactive airways Recurrent wheeze Ever asthma Current asthma Proximity to roadway At birth 1.21 (1.00-1.48) 0.97 (0.73-1.27) 1.02 (0.81-1.28) 0.99 (0.77-1.28) At visit 1.22 (0.99-1.50) 0.88 (0.66-1.18) 1.34 (1.06-1.68) 1.16 (0.89-1.52) BC First year of life 1.13 (0.93-1.38) 1.14 (0.87-1.49) 0.99 (0.80-1.23) 1.07 (0.84-1.36) Lifetime 1.32 (1.03-1.69) 1.26 (0.91-1.74) 1.00 (0.74-1.35) 1.05 (0.75-1.46) Community-level PM2.5 First year of life 2.25 (1.17-4.33) 2.62 (1.08-6.34) 0.94 (0.47-1.85) 0.95 (0.45-2.04) Lifetime 2.35 (1.12-4.91) 2.89 (1.06-7.85) 1.03 (0.45-2.35) 0.95 (0.38-2.38) Table I Air pollution exposures and odds of asthma in early childhood and midchildhood Characteristic Early childhood (3-5 y), n = 1444 Midchildhood (7-10 y), n = 1242 Family/household Tobacco smoking in household (%) No 1139 (87.1) 1004 (88.5) Yes 169 (12.9) 130 (11.5) Maternal history of asthma (%) No 1254 (87.2) 1080 (87.4) Yes 184 (12.8) 155 (12.6) Paternal history of asthma (%) No 1239 (88.2) 1063 (88.1) Yes 166 (11.8) 143 (11.9) Parental history of asthma, eczema, or hay fever (%) No 587 (40.8) 506 (40.9) Yes 852 (59.2) 730 (59.1) Household income (%) $70,000 853 (66.1) 830 (74.4) Residential census tract∗ Median household income, $10,000s 63.2 (23.2) 65.3 (24.8) Percentage with bachelor degree or higher 40.6 (19.5) 41.6 (19.8) Child Age at visit (y) 3.3 (0.4) 8.0 (0.8) Sex (%) Male 742 (51.4) 625 (50.3) Female 702 (48.6) 617 (49.7) Race/ethnicity (%) Black 192 (13.3) 197 (15.9) Hispanic 64 (4.4) 51 (4.1) Asian 50 (3.5) 40 (3.2) White 969 (67.1) 805 (64.9) Other 169 (11.7) 147 (11.9) Birth weight for gestational age z score 0.20 (0.96) 0.20 (0.97) Breast-feeding duration (mo) 6.3 (4.6) 6.5 (4.6) Infantile bronchiolitis No 1104 (86.5) 961 (87.5) Yes 173 (13.5) 137 (12.5) Early atopic dermatitis No 934 (65.0) 752 (64.9) Yes 503 (35.0) 406 (35.1) Outcomes† Early asthma or reactive airways at early childhood (%) No 1124 (78.3) Yes 312 (21.7) Recurrent wheeze at early childhood (%) No 834 (81.7) Yes 187 (18.3) Ever asthma at midchildhood (%) No 963 (77.5) Yes 279 (22.5) Current asthma at midchildhood (%) No 899 (80.4) Yes 219 (19.6) Table E1 Characteristics of 1522 mothers and children in the Project Viva cohort with information on early-life air pollution exposure and asthma outcomes in early childhood or midchildhood Early childhood (3-5 y), n = 1444 Midchildhood (7-10 y), n = 1242 BC (μg/m3) First year of life 0.66 (0.52-0.78) 0.68 (0.53-0.79) Lifetime 0.59 (0.47-0.70) 0.53 (0.43-0.64) Community-level PM2.5 (μg/m3) First year of life 12.1 (11.6-12.5) 12.1 (11.6-12.5) Lifetime 11.7 (11.2-12.1) 10.8 (10.4-11.2) Distance to roadway (m) At time of birth (m) 1114 (464-2429) 1112 (462-2423) Category at time of birth (%) $70,00 .54 4.21 (1.44-12.32) .06 Household income <$70,00 0.82 (0.20-3.44) Parental atopy .15 4.51 (1.63-12.51) .04 No parental atopy 0.90 (0.24-3.37) Table E4 Associations of air pollution exposure with asthma outcomes by effect modifiers (Pinteraction < .1)
  • Identifier: ISSN: 0091-6749 ; E-ISSN: 1097-6825 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.jaci.2017.11.062