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Training Adaptive Teams

Gorman, Jamie C ; Cooke, Nancy J ; Amazeen, Polemnia G ;Gorman, Jamie C (Editor) ; Cooke, Nancy J (Editor) ; Salas, Eduardo (Editor)

Human Factors: The Journal of Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, April 2010, Vol.52(2), pp.295-307 [Peer Reviewed Journal]

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  • Title:
    Training Adaptive Teams
  • Author/Creator: Gorman, Jamie C ; Cooke, Nancy J ; Amazeen, Polemnia G
  • Gorman, Jamie C (Editor) ; Cooke, Nancy J (Editor) ; Salas, Eduardo (Editor)
  • Language: English
  • Subjects: Adaptive Teams ; Cross-Training ; Perturbation Training ; Procedural Training ; Team Cognition ; Team Coordination ; Team Training ; Shared Knowledge ; Task Acquisition ; Uninhabited Air Vehicle ; Novel Situations ; Coordination Variability ; Process-Oriented Training ; Interaction Experience ; Coordination ; Practice Condition Variability ; Engineering ; Psychology
  • Is Part Of: Human Factors: The Journal of Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, April 2010, Vol.52(2), pp.295-307
  • Description: Objective: We report an experiment in which three training approaches are compared with the goal of training adaptive teams. Background: Cross-training is an established method in which team members are trained with the goal of building shared knowledge. Perturbation training is a new method in which team interactions are constrained to provide new coordination experiences during task acquisition. These two approaches, and a more traditional procedural approach, are compared. Method: Assigned to three training conditions were 26 teams. Teams flew nine simulated uninhabited air vehicle missions; three were critical tests of the team’s ability to adapt to novel situations. Team performance, response time to novel events, and shared knowledge were measured. Results: Perturbation-trained teams significantly outperformed teams in the other conditions in two out of three critical test missions. Cross-training resulted in significant increases in shared teamwork knowledge and highest mean performance in one critical test. Procedural training led to the least adaptive teams. Conclusion: Perturbation training allows teams to match coordination variability during training to demands for coordination variability during posttraining performance. Although cross-training has adaptive benefits, it is suggested that process-oriented approaches, such as perturbation training, can lead to more adaptive teams. Application: Perturbation training is amenable to simulation-based training, where perturbations provide interaction experiences that teams can transfer to novel, real-world situations.
  • Identifier: ISSN: 0018-7208 ; E-ISSN: 1547-8181 ; DOI: 10.1177/0018720810371689