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Development and Validation of a Child Version of the Obsessive Compulsive Inventory

Foa, Edna B ; Coles, Meredith ; Huppert, Jonathan D ; Pasupuleti, Radhika V ; Franklin, Martin E ; March, John

Behavior Therapy, 2010, Vol.41(1), pp.121-132 [Peer Reviewed Journal]

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  • Title:
    Development and Validation of a Child Version of the Obsessive Compulsive Inventory
  • Author/Creator: Foa, Edna B ; Coles, Meredith ; Huppert, Jonathan D ; Pasupuleti, Radhika V ; Franklin, Martin E ; March, John
  • Language: English
  • Subjects: Obsessive Compulsive Disorder -- Development And Progression ; Childhood Mental Disorders -- Development And Progression
  • Is Part Of: Behavior Therapy, 2010, Vol.41(1), pp.121-132
  • Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.beth.2009.02.001 Byline: Edna B. Foa (a), Meredith Coles (b), Jonathan D. Huppert (c), Radhika V. Pasupuleti (d), Martin E. Franklin (d), John March (e) Abstract: Surprisingly, only 3 self-report measures that directly assess pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have been developed. In addition, these scales have typically been developed in small samples and fail to provide a quick assessment of symptoms across multiple domains. Therefore, the current paper presents initial psychometric data for a quick assessment of pediatric OCD across multiple symptom domains, a child version of the Obsessive Compulsive Inventory (the OCI-CV). Data from a sample of over 100 youth ages 7 to 17 with a primary DSM-IV diagnosis of OCD support the use of the 21-item OCI-CV. Results support the use of the OCI-CV as a general index of OCD symptom severity and in 6 symptom domains parallel to those assessed by the revised adult version of the scale (OCI-R). The OCI-CV showed strong retest reliability after approximately 1.5 weeks in a subsample of 64 participants and was significantly correlated with clinician-rated OCD symptom severity and parent and child reports of dysfunction related to OCD. Significantly stronger correlations with self-reported anxiety than with depressive symptoms provide initial support for the divergent validity of the measure. Finally, preliminary data with 88 treatment completers suggest that the OCI-CV is sensitive to change. Author Affiliation: (a) University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine (b) Binghamton University (c) University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and The Heibrew University of Jerusalem (d) University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine (e) Duke University Medical Center Article History: Received 21 August 2007; Accepted 15 February 2009
  • Identifier: ISSN: 0005-7894 ; E-ISSN: 1878-1888 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.beth.2009.02.001